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NFL Combine Records: Top performers by Event, Including the 40-yard dash, vertical jump, and More

Each year, the NFL Combine offers an opportunity for invitees to showcase their overall athleticism. Football scouts, NFL GMs, and coaches can use the combine to solidify their initial scouting evaluations for each prospect, and it can also raise questions about a prospect's initial evaluation. Regardless, players who perform at a high level each year have great odds of increasing their NFL Draft stock as they demonstrate physical traits that translate well to professional football. However, it's important to note that while NFL combine performances can boost a prospect's NFL Draft stock, it is just one part of a player's overall evaluation, which includes thorough game tape analysis, individual interviews, and medical assessments.


NFL Combine Top Performers All-Time

40-Yard Dash

Importance: The 40-yard dash is crucial for evaluating a player's speed and acceleration, especially for skill positions like wide receivers, running backs, and defensive backs. John Ross holds the record with a time of 4.22 seconds. Exceptional performance in this drill can significantly boost a player's draft stock.


  • Top Performers:

  1. Washington WR John Ross: 4.22 seconds (2017)

  2. Baylor CB Kalon Barnes: 4.23 seconds (2022)

  3. East Carolina RB Chris Johnson: 4.24 seconds (2008)

  4. Michigan CB DJ Turner: 4.26 seconds (2023)

  5. Texas San Antonio CB Riq Woolen: 4.26 seconds (2022)

  6. Kent State RB Dri Archer: 4.26 seconds (2016)

  7. Alabama WR Henry Ruggs II: 4.27 seconds (2020)

  8. Texas WR Marquise Goodwin: 4.27 seconds (2013)

  9. Baylor WR Tyquan Thornton: 4.28 seconds (2022)

  10. Minnesota CB Jalen Myrick: 4.28 seconds (2017)

  11. UAB WR J.J. Nelson: 4.28 seconds (2015)

  12. Clemson WR Jacoby Ford: 4.28 seconds (2010)

10-Yard Split

Importance: The 10-yard split measures initial acceleration and is particularly important for evaluating linemen and linebackers who need quick bursts of speed. Chris Johnson leads with a 1.40-second record. Good performance here indicates potential for explosive power off the line.


  • Top Performers:

  1. East Carolina RB Chris Johnson: 1.40 seconds (2008)

  2. Alabama WR Henry Ruggs: 1.43 seconds (2020)

  3. Georgia WR Malcom Mitchell: 1.43 seconds (2016)

  4. Mississippi S Zedrick Woods: 1.44 seconds (2019)

  5. LSU CB Donte Jackson: 1.44 seconds (2018)

  6. Houston CB William Jackson: 1.44 seconds (2016)

  7. Ohio State WR Parris Campbell: 1.45 seconds (2019)

  8. UMass Amherst WR Andy Isabella: 1.45 seconds (2019)

  9. Ohio State WR Terry McLaurin: 1.45 seconds (2019)

  10. Mississippi WR DK Metcalf: 1.45 seconds (2019)

  11. Maryland S Darnell Savage: 1.45 seconds (2019)

  12. Auburn WR Darius Slayton: 1.45 seconds (2019)

  13. LSU CB Greedy Williams: 1.45 seconds (2019)

  14. USC CB Terrell Thomas: 1.45 seconds (2008)

Vertical Jump

Importance: This measures lower-body strength and explosiveness, relevant for wide receivers, tight ends, and defensive backs. Chris Conley and Donald Washington share the record at 45 inches. High vertical jumps can indicate good potential for catching or defending high passes.


  • Top Performers:

  1. Georgia WR Chris Conley: 45.00 inches (2015)

  2. Ohio State CB Donald Washington: 45.00 inches (2009)

  3. Michigan WR Donovan Peoples-Jones: 44.50 inches (2020)

  4. Connecticut CB Byron Jones: 44.50 inches (2015)

  5. Illinois SAF Quan Martin: 44.00 inches (2023)

  6. Virginia S Juan Thornhill: 44.00 inches (2019)

  7. Connecticut S Obi Melifonwu: 44.00 inches (2017)

  8. Fresno State CB A.J. Jefferson: 44.00 inches (2010)

  9. Notre Dame WR Miles Boykin: 43.50 inches (2019)

  10. Missouri WR Emanuel Hall: 43.50 inches (2019)

  11. Texas A&M WR Speedy Noil: 43.50 inches (2017)

  12. Utah S Marcus Williams: 43.50 inches (2017)

  13. Connecticut WR Kashif Moore: 43.50 inches (2012)

  14. Pittsburgh TE Dorin Dickerson: 43.50 inches (2010)

Broad Jump

Importance: Similar to the vertical jump, the broad jump assesses lower-body strength and explosiveness, crucial for all positions, particularly skill players. Byron Jones set the NFL combine record at 12 feet, 3 inches. A long broad jump can signify good overall athletic ability and explosiveness.


  • Top Performers:

  1. Connecticut CB Byron Jones: 12 feet, 3 inches (2015)

  2. Missouri WR Emanuel Hall: 11 feet, 9 inches (2019)

  3. Virginia S Juan Thornhill: 11 feet, 9 inches (2019)

  4. Connecticut S Obi Melifonwu: 11 feet, 9 inches (2017)

  5. Notre Dame WR Miles Boykin: 11 feet, 8 inches (2019)

  6. Michigan WR Donovan Peoples-Jones: 11 feet, 7 inches (2020)

  7. Georgia WR Chris Conley: 11 feet, 7 inches (2015)

  8. Southern Mississippi OLB Jamie Collins: 11 feet, 7 inches (2013)

  9. Kansas State CB Julius Brents: 11 feet, 6 inches (2023)

  10. Southern Illinois S Jeremy Chinn: 11 feet, 6 inches (2020)

  11. TCU WR Jalen Reagor: 11 feet, 6 inches (2020)

  12. Kentucky OLB Bud Dupree: 11 feet, 6 inches (2015)

3-Cone Drill

Importance: This drill tests agility, flexibility, and change-of-direction speed. Jeff Maehl and Buster Skrine share the top spot with a time of 6.42 seconds. Excellent performance here is particularly valued for running backs, linebackers, and defensive backs.


  • Top Performers:

  1. Oregon WR Jeff Maehl: 6.42 seconds (2011)

  2. Tennessee-Chattanooga DB Buster Skrine: 6.42 seconds (2011)

  3. West Virginia LB David Long: 6.45 seconds (2019)

  4. Louisville WR Scott Long: 6.45 seconds (2010)

  5. Ohio State WR Dane Sanzenbacher: 6.46 seconds (2011)

  6. BYU FS Daniel Sorensen: 6.47 seconds (2011)

  7. Sam Houston State CB Zyon McCollum: 6.48 seconds (2022)

  8. LSU WR Terrence Toliver: 6.48 seconds (2011)

  9. Stanford WR Devon Cajuste: 6.49 seconds (2016)

  10. Florida RB Chris Rainey: 6.50 seconds (2012)

  11. Texas DB Chykie Brown: 6.50 seconds (2011)

  12. Mount Union College WR Cecil Shorts: 6.50 seconds (2011)

  13. Michigan CB Leon Hall: 6.50 seconds (2007)

20-Yard Shuttle

Importance: The 20-yard shuttle assesses short-area quickness, agility, and change-of-direction capability. Brandin Cooks and Jason Allen hold the record at 3.81 seconds. This is crucial for defensive backs and receivers to demonstrate their lateral speed and quickness.


  • Top Performers:

  1. Oregon State WR Brandin Cooks: 3.81 seconds (2014)

  2. Tennessee CB Jason Allen: 3.81 seconds (2006)

  3. Memphis CB Bobby McCain: 3.82 seconds (2015)

  4. William & Mary CB B.W. Webb: 3.84 seconds (2013)

  5. Boston College FS Justin Simmons: 3.85 seconds (2016)

  6. Washington CB Desmond Trufant: 3.85 seconds (2013)

  7. Boise State WR Austin Pettis: 3.88 seconds (2011)

  8. Washington WR Kevin King: 3.88 seconds (2017)

  9. Wake Forest CB Kevin Johnson: 3.89 seconds (2015)

  10. Louisville WR Damian Copeland: 3.90 seconds (2014)

  11. Vanderbilt DB Casey Hayward: 3.90 seconds (2012)

  12. Idaho DB Shiloh Keo: 3.90 seconds (2011)

  13. Tennessee-Chattanooga DB Buster Skrine: 3.90 seconds (2011)

  14. Oregon State S Sabby Piscitelli: 3.90 seconds (2007)

Bench Press

Importance: This is a test of upper-body strength and endurance, most relevant for linemen and linebackers. Stephen Paea holds the record with 49 reps. A high number of reps can enhance a prospect's profile, especially for those in the trenches.


  • Top Performers:

  1. Oregon State DT Stephen Paea: 49 reps (2011)

  2. Arkansas OL Mitch Petrus: 45 reps (2010)

  3. Ohio State DL Mike Kudla: 45 reps (2006)

  4. Fresno State G Netane Muti: 44 reps (2020)

  5. Memphis DT Dontari Poe: 44 reps (2012)

  6. Georgia DT Jeff Owens: 44 reps (2010)

  7. Stanford DT Harrison Phillips: 42 reps (2018)

  8. North Carolina C Russell Bodine: 42 reps (2014)

  9. N.C State DL Tank Tyler: 42 reps (2007)

  10. Washington DT Vita Vea: 41 reps (2018)

  11. Michigan C David Molk: 41 reps (2012)

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