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Free NFL Draft Database, Applying Approximate Value Metrics To Measure Player And Team Value

Free NFL Draft Dashboard

Before we get started, check out the free Football Scout 365 NFL Draft database. Our database covers past and present NFL Drafts ranking top players and draft years using metrics such as approximate value to measure a player's value. The database provides additional functions, including player age, average age by position, and average years played by position. You can filter by draft round and gain insights about player longevity and positional strength. Are you interested in what year teams drafted the most receivers and RB's, or what draft years provided the most All-Pro or Hall Of Fame players? The dashboard provides all of this free of charge.


Using Approximate Value Metrics To Measure Draft Success

Analysts, fans, and team executives widely use the NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) metric to evaluate players and make informed decisions. This article will explore what NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) is, how it's calculated, and who the top-ranked NFL players of all time are according to this metric.


What is NFL Approximate Value (Weighted)?

NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) is a more advanced version of the NFL Approximate Value (AV) metric introduced by Doug Drinen in 2007. The AV metric was designed to measure a player's value in a single season, but it didn't take into account the differences in eras or positions.


Pro Football Reference (PFR) introduced the Weighted Approximate Value (WAV) metric to address these limitations in 2016. The WAV metric is a modified version of AV that weights a player's performance by position and era.


How is NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) calculated?

NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) is calculated using a complex formula that takes into account a wide range of factors, including:


  • Total yards gained or allowed

  • Touchdowns scored or allowed

  • Interceptions thrown or caught

  • Fumbles recovered or lost

  • Sacks made or allowed

  • Tackles made or missed

  • Games played

  • Position played

  • Era played in


Each factor is weighted differently depending on the player's position and era. For example, a quarterback's passing yards carry a heavier weighted value than a running back's rushing yards. Similarly, a player's performance in the 1960s is weighted differently than in the 2000s.


Who are the top NFL players of all time ranked by weighted approximate value?

According to Pro Football Reference, the top-ranked NFL players of all time based on Weighted Approximate Value are:


  1. Jerry Rice - WAV: 276

  2. Tom Brady - WAV: 260

  3. Peyton Manning - WAV: 256

  4. Reggie White - WAV: 250

  5. Brett Favre - WAV: 244

  6. Walter Payton - WAV: 240

  7. Bruce Smith - WAV: 239

  8. Ray Lewis - WAV: 237

  9. Emmitt Smith - WAV: 234

  10. Drew Brees - WAV: 231


These rankings are based on a player's entire career, not just a single season or game. It's worth noting that this ranking is subjective and can change depending on the criteria used.

FAQs:

Q: How does NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) differ from other metrics like passer rating or yards per carry?

A: NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) is a more comprehensive metric that considers a wider range of factors, including a player's performance on both offense and defense. Passer rating and yards per carry only measure a player's performance in specific areas.


Q: Can NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) be used to compare players from different eras?

A: Yes, that's one of the main advantages of the NFL Approximate Value measure.


Q: Can NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) be used to compare players from different eras?

A: Yes, that's one of the main advantages of NFL Approximate Value (Weighted). The WAV formula is designed to adjust for differences in era, so players from different eras can be compared on an equal footing. However, it's important to keep in mind that there may still be differences in rules, playing styles, and equipment that can affect a player's performance.


Q: Are there any criticisms of NFL Approximate Value (Weighted)?

A: Like any statistic, there are criticisms of NFL Approximate Value (Weighted). Some analysts argue that it doesn't take into account intangible factors like leadership, work ethic, or clutch performance. Others argue that the formula weights certain factors too heavily or too lightly.


Q: Who has the highest WAV score for a single season?

A: The highest WAV score for a single season belongs to Tom Brady, who had a WAV of 34 in the 2007 season. That season, he threw for 4,806 yards and 50 touchdowns while leading the New England Patriots to an undefeated regular season.


Q: Can NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) predict future success?

A: NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) is a retrospective metric that evaluates a player's past performance. While it can be used to identify trends and make informed decisions, it's not designed to predict future success with certainty. There are many factors that can affect a player's performance, including injuries, coaching changes, and roster turnover.


Conclusion:

NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) is a powerful tool for evaluating and comparing NFL players across eras. It considers various factors and weights them based on a player's position and era played. While there are criticisms of the metric, it's widely used by analysts, fans, and team executives to make informed decisions.

The top-ranked NFL players of all time based on Weighted Approximate Value are a who's who of NFL legends, including Jerry Rice, Tom Brady, and Peyton Manning. While these rankings are subjective, they provide valuable insights into the careers of some of the greatest players to step onto the gridiron.

Whether you're a die-hard football fan or a casual observer, understanding NFL Approximate Value (Weighted) can help you appreciate the skills and achievements of the players who have shaped the sport over the years.

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