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2021 NFL Draft Safety Rankings Re-Evaluated

As we move through the pro days and hear the noise of outlandish forty times and verticals through the roof, I have personally gone through and done more research on every position. The Football Scout 365 Big Board Don't forget to check out the full Football Scout 365 NFL Draft Big Board. After Further Review NFL Draft Edition On YouTube You can check out our Football Scout 365 After Further Review NFL Draft Edition on Youtube. We have five shows so far, three covering the QB position where I break down and connect the dots between player skillset and what the player displays on film concerning such buzzwords like arm talent, arm angle, pocket presence etc. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here. What I look for when evaluating a DB. Whether it's a safety or CB, I am looking for similar traits. It starts with the scheme fit and how they translate. Can they adapt to different schemes? Are they more comfortable as a man-to-man defender vs. zone? Are they able to play press-man? Speed and burst matter in the secondary, but speed doesn't matter if a player lacks agility and good technique. Players with quick feet and can react quickly on the fly by flipping their hips are valuable. What do I mean by flipping the hips? Going from your back peddle to a full sprint fast is very important to a DB. The critical part of that transition is flipping your hips to change your body orientation 180 degrees without momentum. It's an awkward body motion that guys at the NFL level make look easy. I also look for willing-run defenders. Can they provide support in the run game? Are they sound in the open field? All of the above can be true for the safety position, but there are some differentiating factors from a CB. You have two safeties in football, free and strong, and sometimes you get a hybrid nickel or LB style safety. The definition of safety has become blurry as they have to be responsible in similar ways at both spots; that's where the hybrid effect comes into play or the undefined role of safety, so to speak, because of how defenses utilize them to defend against pass-heavy spread offenses. So you can understand the difference between a traditional free and strong safety, I'll define it real fast. Free safety is often the deep safety lined up at least 10 yards deep, while the strong safety traditionally lines up on the TE side or the heavy side of an offensive formation. Free safeties are responsible for mostly pass coverage, while a strong safety defends the run while also being accountable for pass coverage. 2021 NFL Draft IDL Rankings Okay, so let's dive into the safety rankings; 1) Oregon S Jevon Holland 6-1 196 lbs Potential Upside Player Holland is known as a leader and a great communicator. He is an agile fluid player who can move into the slot when needed. Holland has CB skills at the safety position. His flexibility adds to his value. He could play corner in the NFL. 2) TCU S Trevon Moehrig 6-1 208 lbs Potential Upside Player A free safety who has lined up in a myriad of spots under Head Coach Gary Patterson, often in a single-high look. He finds the football; he is a ball hawk who does an excellent job at breaking up the football at the catch point. He must improve as a run defender at the next level. 3) USC S Talanoa Hufanga 6-1 215 lbs Potential Upside Player A physical safety who can play deep or in the box. He is strong against the run, and his appeal to NFL GM's places him in the mold of the Derwin James, Jamal Adams style of player. He plays with a violent edge and enjoys contact. He plays with good instincts. He can play zone coverage, and he does well-matched against TE's. Past injury history might be the red flag for some GM's. He has broken his collarbone two times and has dislocated a shoulder. I can attest that it will wear on your body when you try to bring the wood consistently. 4) Georgia S Richard LeCounte III 5-11 190 lbs Potential Upside Player LeCounte communicates well in the secondary is a smart player who can play both man and zone coverage. He can lineup in the slot when needed. He plays with great balance but plays tight at times. LeCounte is a willing special teams player. 5) UCF S Richie Grant 6-0 194 lbs Potential Upside Player Grant is a versatile safety who has played several different roles in the UCF secondary. He is solid in both man and zone coverage and has played a box safety role as well. He projects as a free safety in the NFL. He needs to improve his on-field awareness and tackling. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here.

2021 NFL Draft CB Rankings Re-Evaluated

As we move through the pro days and hear the noise of outlandish forty times and verticals through the roof, I have personally gone through and done more research on every position. The Football Scout 365 Big Board Don't forget to check out the full Football Scout 365 NFL Draft Big Board. After Further Review NFL Draft Edition On YouTube You can check out our Football Scout 365 After Further Review NFL Draft Edition on Youtube. We have five shows so far, three covering the QB position where I break down and connect the dots between player skillset and what the player displays on film concerning such buzzwords like arm talent, arm angle, pocket presence etc. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here. What I look for when evaluating a DB. Whether it's a safety or CB, I am looking for similar traits. It starts with the scheme fit and how they translate. Can they adapt to different schemes? Are they more comfortable as a man-to-man defender vs. zone? Are they able to play press-man? Speed and burst matter in the secondary, but speed doesn't matter if a player lacks agility and good technique. Players with quick feet and can react quickly on the fly by flipping their hips are valuable. What do I mean by flipping the hips? Going from your back peddle to a full sprint fast is very important to a DB. The critical part of that transition is flipping your hips to change your body orientation 180 degrees without momentum. It's an awkward body motion that guys at the NFL level make look easy. I also look for willing-run defenders. Can they provide support in the run game? Are they sound in the open field? All of the above can be true for the safety position, but there are some differentiating factors from a CB. You have two safeties in football, free and strong, and sometimes you get a hybrid nickel or LB style safety. The definition of safety has become blurry as they have to be responsible in similar ways at both spots; that's where the hybrid effect comes into play or the undefined role of safety, so to speak, because of how defenses utilize them to defend against pass-heavy spread offenses. So you can understand the difference between a traditional free and strong safety, I'll define it real fast. Free safety is often the deep safety lined up at least 10 yards deep, while the strong safety traditionally lines up on the TE side or the heavy side of an offensive formation. Free safeties are responsible for mostly pass coverage, while a strong safety defends the run while also being accountable for pass coverage. 2021 NFL Draft CB Rankings Okay, so let's dive into the CB rankings; 1) Alabama CB Patrick Surtain II 6-1 203 lbs Instant Impact Player The son of a former NFL player, Surtain has the pedigree. He is a long player who plays with discipline. Surtain excels in man to man but can play zone when needed. He plays with great technique, and does an excellent job at challenging receivers at the line of scrimmage—Surtain projects as the top CB prospect in the 2021 NFL draft. 2) Va Tech CB Caleb Farley 6-2 197 lbs Potential Upside Player Farley played QB in HS and started his VT career at WR. He is now the 2nd rated CB on our board. At 6-2, 197, he has good physical traits. Farley excels in man coverage, mirrors routes at a high level, and is physical. He needs to improve his zone coverage skills at the next level. 3) South Carolina CB Jaycee Horn 6-1 205 lbs Potential Upside Player The son of former NFL WR Joe Horn, Jacee has the pedigree and is a late riser on our board. He is a solid cover corner, can play zone and press. He needs to improve his tackling. 4) Northwestern CB Greg Newsome 6-1 190 lbs Potential Upside Player A versatile defender who can excel in a cover three or press-man defense. He plays with a long frame at 6-1 and has the speed to stay in the receivers' hip pocket. He uses his body well to defend, not allowing receivers to box him out, and shows a knack for tracking the football down the field. He is an NFL-style outside corner. His primary issue is that he gets grabby at times in man to man. He won't be able to get away with that at the NFL level. 5) Florida State CB Asante Samuel Jr. Potential Upside Player Samuel excels in man to man even at 5-10, 184 lbs; he is a physical player unafraid to play press-man with much larger receivers. As a smaller corner, he uses his agility and quick hips to adjust on the fly. Samuel will mix it up against the run; he is a willing tackler and does well in space. He can use more reps in zone coverage and some work on his catching ability once in the NFL. He projects as an outside corner and can play nickel which adds to his versatility at the next level. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here.

2021 NFL Draft LB Rankings Re-Evaluated

As we move through the pro days and hear the noise of outlandish forty times and verticals through the roof, I have personally gone through and done more research on every position. The Football Scout 365 Big Board Don't forget to check out the full Football Scout 365 NFL Draft Big Board. After Further Review NFL Draft Edition On YouTube You can check out our Football Scout 365 After Further Review NFL Draft Edition on Youtube. We have five shows so far, three covering the QB position where I break down and connect the dots between player skillset and what the player displays on film in relation to such buzzwords like arm talent, arm angle, pocket presence etc. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here. What I look for when evaluating a LB. When examining the LB position, you have to understand how to ID what LB type a player is. Is he an edge-style player? A Mike Backer (Middle), a Jack, or Will backer (weakside). The definitions will vary by the scheme, but to keep things simple, let's talk about LB traits that matter when scouting. Again scheme matters, are they 4-3 or a 3-4 style player, etc. But today, I want to talk about the inside LB positions. I'll start with the Mike LB. The Mike LB is the alpha, the QB of the defense. He is often lined up in the middle of the defense, but his position might vary because of his versatility. Regardless, the Mike LB has to be an instinctual player who can get downhill versus the run, shed blocks, and drop into coverage when necessary. Size and versatility do matter at the LB position now more than ever; whether it's the Mike, Jack, or the WIll, they must all be versatile to defend against the new age pass-heavy offenses. The Mike LB will be lined up on the strong side (TE, or formation heavy) most of the time. The Will LB or the Jack LB will line up opposite to the weak side. Again this also varies based on personnel. So to shorten this up, you want your LB's to be athletic, good tacklers, physical, able to shed blocks, a player who can dance in traffic, and can cover in space. And lastly, does he read and react well to what the offense is throwing at him? does he over pursue or respond wildly to play fakes? Does he find himself in a good position more than out of position? And can he matchup with a TE, RB, or move into the slot if tasked to do so? 2021 NFL Draft LB Rankings Okay, so let's dive into the LB rankings; 1) Penn State LB Micah Parsons 6-2 245 lbs Instant Impact Player LB's ranked this high need to be unique, and Parsons is a real difference-maker. He possesses modern speed and old-school size that NFL coaches and GM's covet. Parsons's ability to sniff out the run game is tremendous. But his speed is undeniable; he possesses 4.3 or low 4.4 speed at a position that needs to cover the NFL's new age TE's. He needs to improve his pass coverage ability at the next level. 2) Notre Dame LB Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah 6-2 216 lbs Potential Upside Player Koramoah fits the mold of today's new-aged LB. Gone are the days where you have two or three 240+ LB's. Koramoah fits the Patrick Queen or Devin Bush mold. As physical as he is fast, he is good in coverage and a very good open-field tackler. 3) Tulsa LB Zaven Collins 6-4 260 lbs Potential Upside Player Arguably the most dynamic defender in CFB, Collins played several high school positions, including QB and safety. Collins is an intelligent player who uses his size, quickness, and power to make splash plays. He won the Nagurski award in 2020 as the nation's top LB, and he did so by posting big play after big play compiling 4 sacks, forcing two fumbles while picking off 4 passes, and scoring two times on defense. He is what NFL defenses are looking for in a LB. A guy who can rush the passer and pass cover when needed. 4) Mizzou LB Nick Bolton 6-0 232 lbs Potential Upside Player Bolton is a capable pass defender and good run stopper; he is a legit Mike linebacker at the next level, which provides your defense with experience. He does a good job at navigating in traffic, and though he can shed blocks, he needs to improve his ability to disengage once he is at the NFL level. He is an NFL-ready player who could be a day one starter. 5) LSU LB Jabril Cox 6-3 233 lbs Potential Upside Player Cox is once again an excellent example of what NFL scouts and GM's are looking for in the NFL at the LB position. He is good in coverage and has the wheels to defend not only athletic TE's, but he can handle RB's when needed. He can guard a slot player if needed, and he thrives in space, an area where a lot of LB's are not agile enough defenders. He needs to do a better job shedding blocks in the run game. His tape vs. run shows promise, but that's the most significant improvement area you see with Cox. NFL defenses will try to attack his weakness as a run defender, so the improvement here can help allow him to become a legitimate and impactful NFL starter. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here.

2021 NFL Draft Edge Rankings Re-Evaluated

As we move through the pro days and hear the noise of outlandish forty times and verticals through the roof, I have personally gone through and done more research on every position. The Football Scout 365 Big Board Don't forget to check out the full Football Scout 365 NFL Draft Big Board. After Further Review NFL Draft Edition On YouTube You can check out our Football Scout 365 After Further Review NFL Draft Edition on Youtube. We have five shows so far, three covering the QB position where I break down and connect the dots between player skillset and what the player displays on film in relation to such buzzwords like arm talent, arm angle, pocket presence etc. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here. What I look for when evaluating a Edge. The Role In a 3-4 (Edge Players) An edge defender in a 3-4 scheme is often in a two-point stance, like a LB. They are to be versatile; needing them to be able to pass rush and pass cover on any given down is a big deal in the NFL. You will also hear terms such as rush LB or sam LB. The rush LB always lines up on the weak side (opposite TE side). Their primary goal is to rush the QB. The Sam LB lines up opposite of the Rush LB. They play on the strong side of defense (TE side). The Sam LB must be strong at the point of attack; the Sam LB focuses on stopping the run while accounting for their area in pass coverage, often against the TE. The Sam LB can be a situational pass rusher, where the coordinator will surprise an offense when sending him after the QB. Other 3-4 edge rusher depictions are ROLB and LOLB. Like the rush LB and the Sam LB, they are more designated to their area and move less with the strength of the offensive formation (where TE lines up doesn't always dictate where they line up). When they are designated to be less dependent on the offensive formation's strength, they have to be versatile enough to be a Sam or a rush style player on any given play. The Role In a 4-3 (Edge Players) The 4-3 edge player is considered a more traditional DE who is responsible for the defense's edge while playing with their hand in the dirt. Some edge rushers can play in either style, while some are scheme dependent and play better with a hand down than in a two-point stance. 4-3 edge players are ordinarily bigger than those in a 3-4 scheme and are more involved as run stoppers and pass rushers and rarely are asked to drop into coverage. Player Traits and SkillSet Some of the traits I look for, speed, power, and push. The players who have both speed and power are high-level players. How they use their hands to disengage with a blocker is essential. And the last but not least area is awareness and IQ. A guy who is a student of the game, who can recognize pre-snap movements or player positioning and make adjustments to their movement post-snap are the best defenders in the NFL. Once again, Aaron Donald possesses all of these traits. 2021 NFL Draft Edge Rankings Okay, so let's dive into the Edge rankings; 1) Michigan Edge Kwity Paye 6-4 277 lbs Potential Upside Player Paye is an explosive athlete who has yet to reach his full potential. He uses a blend of speed, power, and hand usage to defeat blockers. His game is not perfect, but his ceiling is very high. Paye was not a full-time starter at Michigan until 2020. He is a player with a lot of drive and motivation that we believe can fuel him at the next level. 2) Miami Edge Jaelan Phillips 6-5 258 lbs Potential Upside Player Phillips is an exciting prospect. He was a five-star recruit who had a lot of ability when he arrived at UCLA; he had a few injuries that sidelined him and forced him to retire from football. Phillips questioned his passion for the game at one point. Phillips un-retired and transferred to Miami to get a fresh start; he had an excellent 2020. Phillips is a physical player at 6-6 260 lbs. He shines when pass rushing and against the run. He is a versatile defender who has that rare blend of speed to power off the edge that is eye-opening. He can play with his hand in the dirt or a two-point. He can rush from the interior when needed, which adds to his versatility. The big questions are, does he love the game? Can he remain healthy, and his experience. He has the tools to be a high-impact NFL starter. 3) Wake Forest Edge Carlos Basham Jr. 6-3 280 lbs Potential Upside Player A big play waiting to happen, Basham compiled 19.5 sacks and seven forced fumbles from 2018-20. He was also a force in the backfield, collecting 32 TFL's in that same span. Basham plays with power and wants to win by bullying his blocker into the QB's lap. For him to be an elite edge player in the NFL, he has to get stronger to match NFL tackle strength; he cannot try to win with power at all times if he is not stronger. He is not a flashy edge guy with many moves, which is an area where he can improve. He has what it takes to be a starter at the NFL level. He projects as a 4-3 edge player. 4) Georgia Edge Azeez Ojulari 6-3 240 lbs Potential Upside Player Azeez Ojulari is a 3-4 style Edge player who has good wheels and body control. He has a high motor and can use his speed to put tackles in conflict. He is a strong run game defender who can track down the ball carrier with his short-area quickness. Ojulari still must improve in many areas, and his projection across all NFL draft boards is based on upside. His size is a big question mark where he might not win consistently on edge vs. more physically and fleet-footed tackles. 5) Miami Edge Gregory Rousseau 6-5 260 lbs Potential Upside Player A long player who can slide inside when needed. He is not yet fully developed, but his upside is what scouts might be eyeing. He uses quick hands to disengage with blockers and can set the edge and force runs back inside. He does need to work on his strength at the next level. He was a high school WR, which explains his hand usage and his raw ability as an edge defender. His pass-rush ability might be more suited on the inside rather than trying to win the edge. He is an outstanding prospect who has the NFL size and ability to develop into an impactful starter. Another item to keep in mind, he only has one year as a starter, injured in 2018, and sat out 2020. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here.

2021 NFL Draft IDL Rankings Re-Evaluated

As we move through the pro days and hear the noise of outlandish forty times and verticals through the roof, I have personally gone through and done more research on every position. The Football Scout 365 Big Board Don't forget to check out the full Football Scout 365 NFL Draft Big Board. After Further Review NFL Draft Edition On YouTube You can check out our Football Scout 365 After Further Review NFL Draft Edition on Youtube. We have five shows so far, three covering the QB position where I break down and connect the dots between player skillset and what the player displays on film in relation to such buzzwords like arm talent, arm angle, pocket presence etc. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here. What I look for when evaluating an IDL. The first thing you want to look for when scouting the IDL position is where they fit scheme-wise? Is he a two-gap 3-4 interior player or a one-gap 4-3 defender? In a 3-4 defensive scheme, my nose tackle will generally lineup over the center's head and is accountable for both A-gaps. I want my nose tackle to take up space in the middle so that my 2nd level guys can make plays without defenders getting to the second level. You also want them to possess the strength to get off of a block and make a play in the run game. My 3-4 ends are also two-gap responsible; I need them to hold down the B and C gap on each side. In a one-gap 4-3 scheme, you have the two IDL; one is usually considered one tech who lines up half shade over the center in the B gap opposite the three-technique player who is in the B gap half shade over the guard. Both are responsible for stopping the run and rushing the passer when needed. Some of the traits I look for, speed, power, and push. The players who have both speed and power are high-level players. How they use their hands to disengage with a blocker is essential. And the last but not least area is awareness and IQ. A guy who is a student of the game, who can recognize pre-snap movements or player positioning and make adjustments to their movement post-snap are the best defenders in the NFL. Once again, Aaron Donald possesses all of these traits. 2021 NFL Draft IDL Rankings Okay, so let's dive into the IDL rankings; 1) Alabama IDL Christian Barmore 6-5 310 lbs Potential Upside Player The 6-5 310 lbs Christian Barmore arrived at Alabama as a developmental player who has come into his own. He can play the 1, 3, or the 4i; Barmore uses his strength more than a toolbox of moves. Though he has improved his technique, he can use more development. 2) Iowa IDL Daviyon Nixon 6-3 305 lbs Potential Upside Player Nixon is an impressive prospect projected to be a three tech in the NFL. He can shoot a gap because of his burst, using a strong lower profile to explode into an opponent's backfield to disrupt. At over 300 Lbs, he has deceptive speed. On film, Nixon shows the ability to track a ball carrier in the backfield and make a play in pursuit. He is not a wide defender; he could use some work as a power rusher; teams might take advantage of him with a downhill run game. He is a guy who has starting potential and needs some development at the NFL level. 3) NC State Alim McNeill 6-2 315 lbs Potential Upside Player He plays with a solid base; he is hard to move. He has a knack for squeezing through gaps disrupting plays. He plays with good hand placement, does a great job of fighting off double teams. 4) Washington IDL Levi Onwuzurike 6-3 290 lbs Potential Upside Player One of the better pass rushers in the 2021 class, he plays with good leverage and athleticism. He plays with good technique and is hard to single block. He can excel in a 4-3 scheme but can also play in an odd front. 5) Ohio State IDL Tommy Togiai 6-2 300 lbs Developmental Big run-stopper, who can play both the 1, and 3 tech. Togiai projects as a nose player but can play 3-4 DE role in the NFL. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here.

2021 NFL Draft Offensive Tackle Rankings Re-Evaluated

As we move through the pro days and hear the noise of outlandish forty times and verticals through the roof, I have personally gone through and done more research on every position. The Football Scout 365 Big Board Don't forget to check out the full Football Scout 365 NFL Draft Big Board. After Further Review NFL Draft Edition On YouTube You can check out our Football Scout 365 After Further Review NFL Draft Edition on Youtube. We have five shows so far, three covering the QB position where I break down and connect the dots between player skillset and what the player displays on film in relation to such buzzwords like arm talent, arm angle, pocket presence etc. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here. What I look for when evaluating an OT. For the most part, you scout all of the offensive line positions similarly with a few variations. Everything begins and ends with how a player moves, observing the prospect's first few steps when in pass pro, their athleticism and ability to get to an area to block in the run game, hand usage, and strength. Pass Blocking Some prospects are raw but athletic and need polish, vs. some who are very technical but lack strength or athleticism. As a pass blocker, how well does the lineman use his hands? Does he stick and move like a boxer with good footwork (punch defender). How does he handle a bull rush or players who use a wide array of hand combos to disengage? Where are his eyes? Is the prospect flat-footed at times or consistently on his toes? Run Blocking Can the prospect get a good push or move a defender? Can he leverage the defender with his size? Does he play with a good bend (bends at the knee, not at the waist)? When moving the defender, does he distribute his power from the legs up? Is the prospect's hand placement in the correct area (inside shoulders, thumbs are pointing up)? Does the player finish, and is he consistent in all of these critical areas? Scheme Fit The scheme fit matters; some guys are more comfortable in a zone-blocking scheme than, say a power, or gap scheme; some are good at both. Some are good with straight-up man blocking one on one; it varies with the run game as a general rule; Gap schemes are more effective if your offensive linemen are not physically as strong as the defensive linemen help deal with stunts and twists. Zone Schemes are great ways to feature a runner with great vision and punish fast-flowing linebackers. 2021 NFL Draft OT Rankings Okay, so let's dive into the OT rankings; 1) Oregon OT Penei Sewell 6-5 325 lbs Instant Impact Player Sewell received better grades in 2019 than other highly rated tackle prospects entering the 2020 NFL Draft. The talent is unquestioned, and if it were not for the strong QB class, Sewell would be the top player drafted in 2021. He is versatile, can play IOL if needed. Sewell is a mauler in the run game who can move his defender with ease. He can get to the second level and attach to defenders in space. In pass pro, He plays with a solid base and is fundamentally sound using good hand placement. What concerns me is that he didn't face many versatile edge players in college in the Pac 12. But he is also only 20 years old, meaning that he holds great value in terms of potential years he can play. 2) Va Tech Christian OT Darrisaw 6-5 314 lbs Potential Upside Player Darrisaw consistently improved while at Va Tech. He is known more as an excellent pass blocker who wins with his feet in pass protection. Speed rushers beware; Darrisaw understands how to defend against versatile rushers who like to throw changeups in the middle of pass rush. He improved in this area over the years, proving he can win one on one in space vs. athletic defenders. As a run blocker, he is agile; he can locate a defender and latch on in space. The knock-on Darrisaw can have moments of inconsistency or a half-hearted effort that happens far less in 2020 than previous years, proving his consistent upward arch of improvement. 3) Northwestern OT Rashawn Slater 6-4 315 lbs Potential Upside Player Slater can play tackle or guard. He is a powerful athlete who wins with fundamentals and good power. He plays with good bend and is consistent with his pad level. He plays with good footwork; his first step allows him to position and leveraging his frame to wall off defenders. His hand placement is consistent and adequate to win at the NFL level. He needs to work on his ability to drive defenders off the football in the run game more consistently, using his power and an excellent base to fire into the defender. 4) Alabama OT Alex Leatherwood 6-5 312 lbs Potential Upside Player Leatherwood is another tackle who can move to guard, he is versatile, and that is important in the NFL, where a guy who possesses the ability to play inside and out is a valuable trait. He plays with power and aggression; he can operate as a road grader in the run game. As a pass blocker, he needs work; he is adequate and might be a liability early in his career if playing tackle. He possesses the ability to handle quick edge rushers, but he doesn't play well against those possessing a litany of combo moves. Leatherwood might benefit from a year at guard where he doesn't have to cover as wide an area, but there is no doubt he has the size and enough tools already to become an NFL starter with a season of development? 5) Michigan OT Jalen Mayfield 6-5 319 lbs Potential Upside Player We may have the highest grade for this prospect out of any service. Mayfield had a great 2019 season; he opted out of 2020 and then opted back in. Mayfield graded well in 2019-20. He is a player with elite athleticism and size. He does lack experience posting less than 1000 snaps at Michigan. His upside will hinge on his ability to improve his hand placement and show more consistency as a pass blocker. He can often open up too wide or incorrectly place his hands too far outside rather than inside the defender. He is a versatile player who can move from tackle to guard if needed or full-time, depending on how well he develops. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here.

2021 NFL Draft Interior Offensive Line Rankings Re-Evaluated

As we move through the pro days and hear the noise of outlandish forty times and verticals through the roof, I have personally gone through and done more research on every position. The Football Scout 365 Big Board Don't forget to check out the full Football Scout 365 NFL Draft Big Board. After Further Review NFL Draft Edition On YouTube You can check out our Football Scout 365 After Further Review NFL Draft Edition on Youtube. We have five shows so far, three covering the QB position where I break down and connect the dots between player skillset and what the player displays on film in relation to such buzzwords like arm talent, arm angle, pocket presence etc. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here. What I look for when evaluating an IOL. For the most part, you scout all of the offensive line positions similarly with a few variations. Everything begins and ends with how a player moves, observing the prospect's first few steps when in pass pro, their athleticism and ability to get to an area to block in the run game, hand usage, and strength. Pass Blocking Some prospects are raw but athletic and need polish, vs. some who are very technical but lack strength or athleticism. As a pass blocker, how well does the lineman use his hands? Does he stick and move like a boxer with good footwork (punch defender). How does he handle a bull rush or players who use a wide array of hand combos to disengage? Where are his eyes? Is the prospect flat-footed at times or consistently on his toes? Run Blocking Can the prospect get a good push or move a defender? Can he leverage the defender with his size? Does he play with a good bend (bends at the knee, not at the waist)? When moving the defender, does he distribute his power from the legs up? Is the prospect's hand placement in the correct area (inside shoulders, thumbs are pointing up)? Does the player finish, and is he consistent in all of these critical areas? Scheme Fit The scheme fit matters; some guys are more comfortable in a zone-blocking scheme than, say a power, or gap scheme; some are good at both. Some are good with straight-up man blocking one on one; it varies with the run game as a general rule; Gap schemes are more effective if your offensive linemen are not physically as strong as the defensive linemen help deal with stunts and twists. Zone Schemes are great ways to feature a runner with great vision and punish fast-flowing linebackers. 2021 NFL Draft IOL Rankings Okay, so let's dive into the IOL rankings; 1) USC IOL Alijah Vera-Tucker 6-4 300 lbs Potential Upside Player Tucker is our top interior offensive lineman due to his versatility. He played tackle and guard while at USC; he excelled at both. He plays with good athleticism and shows good bend. He has the power to punch defenders back in the passing game, reset and punch again. He knows how to handle a bull-rushing defender and handles space well. As a run blocker, he gets good push and uses his lower body in combination with his punch to strike defenders and move them. He fits any scheme at the NFL level. 2) Ohio State IOL Wyatt Davis 6-4 310 lbs Potential Upside Player Davis is a big, wide body who plays with a good bend, consistently maintaining his posture through contact and not losing leverage. His hands are consistently where they need to be, inside the defender's shoulders with palms in, thumbs up. He possesses good lateral ability in combination with his ability to get to the second level and attach to defenders in space. He fits any scheme and has the versatility to play on either side of the center. He is also as NFL-ready as it gets. 3) Alabama IOL Landon Dickerson 6-6 326 lbs Potential Upside Player Dickerson is a versatile player; he has experience playing every position upfront. He settled in at the center position at Alabama, where he won the Rimington award in 2020 as the nation's top center. He possesses good strength as a blocker; he does not have great athleticism, which must be considered at the next level. He is a strong interior run blocker. He is an intelligent player who projects as a center in the NFL, with the ability to move to guard as needed. Outside of his strength, his ability to stay healthy might be where Dickerson runs into snags come draft day. 4) Oklahoma IOL Creed Humphrey 6-4 312 lbs Potential Upside Player Humphrey is a wide specimen who plays with good leverage at the point of attack. He wins within the A gaps on the offensive line, which might be a limiting factor in his draft stock. He does exhibit good bend at the knees and shows good hand placement consistently. He has a lot of games under his belt, having started three years with the Sooners, so he brings a lot of experience to the NFL with him. He is functional enough to play in a zone, gap, or hybrid man style scheme at the NFL level and does possess NFL starter quality traits. 5) Ohio State IOL Josh Myers 6-5 312 lbs Potential Upside Player Myers is not a versatile lineman like some of the other interior guys, but he can be adequate if needed to move into a position other than center. He is a wide-body, who is not overly athletic, wins with good lateral mobility. Still, his quickness needs to improve to become versatile enough to play another position on the offensive line when required. Though I have a lot of faith in Myers and what I have seen him do, it all boils down to his ability to continue developing. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here.

2021 NFL Draft TE Rankings Re-Evaluated

As we move through the pro days and hear the noise of outlandish forty times and verticals through the roof, I have personally gone through and done more research on every position. The Football Scout 365 Big Board Don't forget to check out the full Football Scout 365 NFL Draft Big Board. After Further Review NFL Draft Edition On YouTube You can check out our Football Scout 365 After Further Review NFL Draft Edition on Youtube. We have five shows so far, three covering the QB position where I break down and connect the dots between player skillset and what the player displays on film concerning such buzzwords like arm talent, arm angle, pocket presence, etc. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here. What I look for when evaluating a TE. Some of the key traits to look for when evaluating the tight end position, do they possess good hands, are they a good to adequate blocker? I examine their size relative to similar style players. Are they used more as an inline blocker, or in the slot, or flexed wide? Or are they versatile enough to do both? Are they a Hybrid, Fullback style TE, a guy I can lineup in the backfield and use to iso block for the RB? Are they a good route runner? Are they athletic in space? Can they get separation when route running? Is the prospect an enthusiastic blocker? 2021 NFL Draft TE Rankings Okay, so let's dive into the TE rankings; 1) Florida TE Kyle Pitts 6-5 239 lbs Instant Impact Player Pitts is a special player who fits the mold of what NFL GM's and coaches are looking for in today's football. He can move around the formation, play inline, and split out wide. He is very athletic, with great hands. Pitts, a former QB, is an elite athlete with an elite skill set. Whoever drafts him will be getting an elite talent. 2) Miami TE Brevin Jordan 6-3 245 lbs Potential Upside Player Like Kyle Pitts, Brevin Jordan is a dynamic player; he can lineup inline, slot, or flex out wide. Jordan has also logged snaps out of the backfield. Jordan is a seam-busting TE who is NFL-ready. He can use work expanding his route tree at the next level. Whoever lands Jordan will be drafting a potential star. 3) Penn State TE Pat Freiermuth 6-5 250 lbs Potential Upside Player Friermuth is a more traditional player who can line up inline and block in the run game, line up in the slot, or out wide to gain a potential matchup advantage. In high school, the former basketball player showcased his box-out skills against defenders to win one-on-one jump balls. He is not a speedy player but has enough burst off the LOS to get his body in front of second-level defenders to make short to intermediate catches. He can improve his ability as a blocker, needs to work on his hand usage and footwork. 4) Notre Dame TE Tommy Tremble 6-4 248 lbs Potential Upside Player Tremble is an H-Back move-style player. He is a good blocker in the run game who plays aggressively. To me, his ability as a pass-catcher is not refined but adequate. He needs to improve his route running and his ability to separate at the second and third levels. He does have a good burst off the LOS and can beat defenders early. He can box out defenders to make contested catches. His only big red flag is that he was not utilized a lot as a receiver and needs more reps. It might have more to do with his college development as a receiver; the coaching might be a factor. Once in the NFL, if paired with the right staff, he can be legit TE1 in due time. 5) Boston College TE Hunter Long 6-5 254 lbs Potential Upside Player Long might be a big-time get in the 2021 NFL draft, and after reviewing his tape, it's easy to see how he might translate and become the second-best TE in the NFL draft. He possesses the tools, good route running ability, has good hands, can block well in pass pro and the run game. He is a tough player who can handle contact and hold on to catches. He attacks the catch point as well or better than some WR's. He lacks athletic ability similar to the top-level players, such as Kyle Pitts, but his game is perfect for the NFL level. He might already be at or near his ceiling, he can still improve his route running, and every TE always has room to improve as a blocker. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here.

Interview With Collectively Evolving Lafayette 7 on 7 Camp Director Jeep Morehouse

I recently had the great opportunity to interview Jeep Morehouse, Director of Collectively Evolving Lafayette, a member of the #1 Premier Off-Season Program In Indiana. Our discussion covers various topics from his journey to becoming a teacher at Lafayette Jefferson and a 7 on 7 camp director at Collectively Evolving. Jeep provides detailed insights into the 7 on 7 football world and its inner workings. Jeep discusses his passion for building community and providing leadership to those who attend the Collectively Evolving camp circuit. Former Michigan RB and current 2021 NFL Draft prospect Chris Evans is the founder of Collectively Evolving. Current 2021 NFL Draft prospect Chris Evans founded the not-for-profit Collectively Evolving organization during his time playing college football at the University of Michigan. Collectively Evolving is based in the state of Indiana, with different entities stretching from Michigan to Kentucky. The camp circuit focuses on impacting young athletes from pre-teen to high school by providing offseason 7 on 7 camps, leagues, and tournaments. The CE Mission says it all, "Helping young athletes discover the CHAMPION WITHIN through skills development, mentorship & exposure platforms while promoting a clear understanding of what it takes to be a CHAMPION in sports and in life." For more information, check out the Collectively Evolving website; you can also follow them on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

Your Guide to The 2021 NFL Draft

As we inch closer to the 2021 NFL Draft, we have prepared a curated guide of all of our NFL Draft analysis with links to our NFL Draft Big Board, position rankings, mock drafts, and team needs. Everything you need all in one place. Check back for more NFL Draft content. Latest After Further Review Episode on YouTube Clickable Links 2021 NFL Draft Big Board (Player Rankings) (Rankings have been updated as of 3/29/21) Situational Team Analysis (Situational will be updated to reflect all of the free agency moves in early April). Our Latest Mock Draft (We are preparing our last mock once the dust has settled on free agency). Check out the After Further Review NFL Draft Edition Podcast. Analysts Brandon Lundberg and CJ McLaughlin go in-depth as they try to decode what teams in the top ten of the 2021 NFL Draft will do based on team needs and discuss how it will affect the rest of the draft order in round one. Position Rankings and Positional Skillset Analysis Offensive Positional Rankings QB, RB, WR, TE, OT, IOL Defensive Positional Rankings IDL, Edge, LB, CB, S

2021 NFL Draft RB Rankings Re-Evaluated

As we move through the pro days and hear the noise of outlandish forty times and verticals through the roof, I have personally gone through and done more research on every position. I have finished the QB's, WR's and now we begin the RB re-evaluation. The Football Scout 365 Big Board Don't forget to check out the full Football Scout 365 NFL Draft Big Board. After Further Review NFL Draft Edition On YouTube You can check out our Football Scout 365 After Further Review NFL Draft Edition on Youtube. We have five shows so far, three covering the QB position where I break down and connect the dots between player skillset and what the player displays on film concerning such buzzwords like arm talent, arm angle, pocket presence etc. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here. What I look for when evaluating a RB. These are not in any particular order, but I will point out that I always identify the RB's who show patience as a runner. When I say patience, I like backs, which allow the guard to pull to the designated blocking zone before hitting that area hard. A great example of a back with great patience or who allowed his blockers to get set up was Lev Bell when he played at his best in the Steelers offense. I like to key in on other aspects: are they tough between the tackles, do they possess good contact balance, and can they create yards after contact? I like a back with good vision, one who sees the opening before it's there, or who can ID what is not available and can bounce the play outside or locate the cut back lane. I also look for a guy who possesses a good burst; he doesn't have to be a burner. I like a guy who can explode in a small space to get to the edge when needed or explode through a closing void. One of the more critical aspects is, can the guy pass block, or is he a willing pass blocker? Skills as a receiver, how good of a receiver is he out of the backfield? Can he line up in the slot if we want to create that mismatch? How versatile is the player's skill set as a receiver? 2021 NFL Draft RB Rankings Okay, so let's dive into the RB rankings; 1) Alabama RB Najee Harris Instant Impact Player Hard to tackle, shifty, yet not a burner. At times, Harris has shown a lack of discipline as a runner, but in the 2020 SEC title game, and CFP, Harris has come on strong displaying a high level of athleticism as both a runner and a pass-catcher. He can run high at times at 6-2, but that's not a major factor. He is a more dynamic receiver than he gets credit for, and that's the differentiating factor in our rankings; he displayed high-level receiver skills in 2020, at times reminding me of a young Lev Bell. 2) Clemson RB Travis Etienne Instant Impact Player The ACC's all-time rusher, he could have left Clemson a season ago but decided to return. Etienne plays with great burst and contact balance and is an excellent pass catcher. His skill set is that of the new age NFL RB's (Kamara, CMC, Barkley). Where he needs improvement is as a pass blocker and with fumbles. The positives for Etienne outweigh the negatives. 3) North Carolina RB Javonte Williams Potential Upside Player Williams is a dynamic player who is capable of ripping off a big play at any moment. Williams runs behind his pads but can also make you miss in space. He uses a combination of good vision to locate the open areas and uses his blocks well. Williams is a capable three-down player with good ability as a receiver and is a competent pass protector. 4) North Carolina RB Michael Carter Potential Upside Player Michael Carter has been a steady force in Chapel Hill since 2017. Carter is a dynamic RB who excels as a receiver for the Tarheels. He is elusive and possesses great instincts as a runner allowing him to find lanes inside or out. Carter is on the smaller side, but you would not be able to tell by his willingness to run between the tackles. He is hard to tackle, and when you do have him reeled in, you better wrap up and hold on because he has a knack for slipping through tackles. Some scouts believe Carter will fit a complementary role in the NFL. We think he is a sneaky good player with three-down ability who could potentially be the number one in the right situation. 5) Oregon State RB Jermar Jefferson Potential Upside Player Jefferson is a creative player; when he has space, he knows how to use it by putting defenders in conflict both as a runner and as a pass-catcher. He is a hard-nosed runner with good balance and is also good at locating daylight to exploit the defense. 6) Memphis RB Kenneth Gainwell Developmental Player Dynamic and elusive, Gainwell is one of the best athletes in the 2021 NFL Draft. Memphis did a great job utilizing his skill set as both a runner and a receiver. He is a tough runner, even at 191lbs, who also possesses great instincts. His ability as a pass-catcher will add to his draft stock as coaches can be creative within their scheme lining him up all over the formation. Gainwell might need to add some weight to his frame but has the tools to be an NFL starter. 7) Oklahoma RB Rhamondre Stevenson Developmental Player A Juco transfer before arriving in Norman, Stevenson is a physical player weighing around 235lbs; he can run through a defender just as easily as he can make them miss. He has good feet and plays with patience allowing his blockers to set up before hitting the next gear. Stevenson is a good receiver out of the backfield, and that's an asset that will bode well for him at the NFL level. He was suspended in 2019 and missed five games due to suspension in 2020. He lacks reps, but he made the most of the opportunity when given a chance in a limited window. 8) Ohio State RB Trey Sermon Developmental Player Climbing is the word on Trey Sermon. In the last two games (Big Ten Title, CFP Semi), Sermon has been exceptional. He is a willing blocker and good pass catcher out of the backfield. He is a player to keep an eye on, and he has a shot to slip into the day two discussion. 9) Oklahoma State RB Chuba Hubbard Developmental Player Chuba Hubbard is a tough player who has been difficult to tackle since high school and even harder to catch. Hubbard competed in track in high school, competing in the IAAF World Youth Championships in Cali, Colombia, placing fourth overall in the 100-meter sprint with a personal-best finish of 10.55 seconds in the semifinal. His game has evolved while in college as he has improved his patience and vision while in Stillwater. Where he has not thrived is as a pass-catcher. He lacks concentration as a receiver and could use more development in this department. 10) Michigan RB Chris Evans Developmental Player Chris Evans possesses the skill set NFL and GM's covet at the RB position. Evans shows good instincts as a runner, displaying good vision, patience combined with a good burst and breakaway speed. What GM's will fall in love with is his ability as a receiver. Evans has good ball skills and can line up all over the formation as a receiver. The one knock, he had to sit out the 2019 season due to an academic issue at Michigan, and he didn't separate from a full Michigan backfield in 2020. Regardless, Evans is a player to keep an eye on. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here.

2021 NFL Draft WR Rankings Re-Evaluated

As we move through the pro days and hear the noise of outlandish forty times and verticals through the roof, I have personally gone through and done more research on every position. I have finished the QB's and now we begin the WR re-evaluation. The Football Scout 365 Big Board Don't forget to check out the full Football Scout 365 NFL Draft Big Board. After Further Review NFL Draft Edition On YouTube You can check out our Football Scout 365 After Further Review NFL Draft Edition on Youtube. We have five shows so far, three covering the QB position where I break down and connect the dots between player skillset and what the player displays on film in relation to such buzzwords like arm talent, arm angle, pocket presence etc. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here. What I Look For When Evaluating a WR The Ability to separate, can play inside or outside, strong hands, the ability to fight through press, can track the football, good body control, good hands, attacks the catch point, good route running, agility, ability to make defenders miss in space, effort without the football, uses leverage, can stack a DB, can make contested catches in traffic, can box out, plays bigger than his size, or uses his size well, explosive. 2021 NFL Draft WR Rankings Okay, so let's dive into the WR rankings; 1) Alabama WR DeVonta Smith 6-1 175 lbs Instant Impact Player Smith is an absolute gamer who rises to the occasion in the big moments. His combination of quick, efficient footwork, great hands, and fluid route running are tailor-made for the NFL. Smith was second fiddle to Waddle before the Waddle injury. Smith proved before the Waddle injury that he could handle the number one role in the Alabama offense. 2) LSU WR Ja'Marr Chase 6-1 208 lbs Instant Impact Player Chase broke the SEC single-season receiving record in 2019 and was one of Joe Burrows's go-to WR's. Chase has great hands, is a good route runner, and is good running after the catch. He is also a willing blocker in the run game. The big question is how well he will play outside of the structure he had at LSU under OC Joe Brady and catching passes from Joe Burrow, who had a historic season. Chase is an outstanding player who will undoubtedly find his way at the next level regardless of the system. 3) Alabama WR Jaylen Waddle 5-10 182 lbs Instant Impact Player Waddle is a versatile athlete; he can line up anywhere on the field. He is by far the most difficult player to defend in the 2021 NFL Draft. DB's struggle to get their hands on him at the line of scrimmage, and while in coverage, they often are left behind in his wake. His route running ability and precise cuts allow him to get separation from DB's. Unlike Ruggs (many compare to Ruggs), Waddle is not just a straight-line speed player who relies on downfield throws; he is effective at all levels displaying great hands, and can high point the football with ease. He might be the next Tyreek Hill in the NFL (not a comp, or even a guarantee); Waddle is an undersized player yet possesses top-level NFL WR traits. It would be best if you always had an extra set of eyes on him (help defender). Waddle wins one on one with ease. Waddle could quickly become the top WR in this draft once we look back in hindsight. 4) Purdue WR Rondale Moore 5-7 180 lbs Potential Upside Player We have compared Rondale Moore to Tyreek Hill, Steve Smith JR, Tyler Lockett, and Saquon Barkley. Moore defines speed in space, but he also defies logic at 5-9 180lbs; he reportedly can squat 600lbs, and it shows on the field. When he is not making a defender miss in a phone booth, he has the power to run through tackles. Moore can lineup all over the formation. He can flex out wide, in the slot, or the backfield. He is a good route runner. He is also a dynamic special teams player. The only knock is his health post-injury. It feels like forever since his incredible 2018 season, where he compiled 2000+ all-purpose yards. He did make his way back in 2020, and while he was not 100%, he showed once again why we believe he is worthy of being a first-round pick. 5) Florida WR Kadarius Toney 5-11 189 lbs Potential Upside Player Fast, with track speed, a versatile player who played QB in HS. Toney projects as a slot WR with a limited route tree that needs to be diversified. He can break a game wide open in the blink of an eye and line up all over the formation and in the backfield when needed. 6) LSU WR Terrace Marshall 6-3 200 lbs Potential Upside Player Another LSU WR with size, speed, and athleticism will enter the league in 2021. Marshall is a physical WR with good body control and often uses his body to wall off defenders. Marshall attacks the football at the catch point. Marshall had only two drops in 2019. He needs to work on his route running at the next level. 7) Minnesota WR Rashod Bateman 6-1 210 lbs Potential Upside Player Bateman is a versatile player; he is a good route runner, has excellent ball skills, and has good size. He is not a player who takes the top off of a defense, but he does have the frame to box out a defender in a tight area, displaying an ability to attack the football at its highest point. His precision as a route runner is where he finds separation. 8) North Carolina WR Dyami Brown 6-1 195 lbs Potential Upside Player A big-play threat the last two seasons in Chapel Hill, Brown averaged 20+ yards per reception in 2019-20. He plays with an explosive burst both off the LOS, and within his routes; he can go from 75% speed, lulling a DB to sleep before opening it up to 100% and leaving the DB behind. He does well tracking the football, and after the catch, he can break tackles. Where scouts are warry, his route tree is lacking. He runs a basic college-level tree that needs development. 9) Michigan WR Nico Collins 6-4 215 lbs Potential Upside Player Collins is a post player at WR; he uses his frame to box out defenders and does a great job tracking the football. At 6-4 215, Collins has the speed to stack DB's consistently. He is a player that NFL QB's can rely on in the RedZone; He can adjust to the back shoulder throws, and on in-breaking routes in the red area, he uses his frame well, walling off defenders. Coaches and GM's will fall in love with his skillset. 10) Ole Miss WR Elijah Moore 5-9 184 lbs Potential Upside Player Not the biggest WR out there, Moore shows impressive strength and physicality for someone his size. Moore also offers some good (albeit not elite). His top asset is his top-end speed, and he can snap off explosive plays if defenses give him some space. He projects as a slot receiver in the NFL. He can line up in the backfield, slot, or outside, which adds to his value. Go To The NFL Draft Guide To View More Content by Clicking Here.

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